Bear Mountain Capital Inc.

Update: The Trump Administration Relaxes Several Dodd-Frank Provisions

| June 29, 2018

As we discussed on this blog over a year ago, repeal of the Dodd-Frank Act was a significant plank in President Trump’s election platform. Dodd-Frank was Congress’s legislative response to the 2007-2008 financial crisis; it substantially restructured federal oversight of the banking industry with the intent to reduce the chances of another liquidity and credit crisis. While a complete repeal of Dodd Frank was never really in the cards (some…

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What Does Tax Reform Mean To You and Your Portfolio?

| March 13, 2018

Congress and the President recently passed the biggest tax reform in over 30 years. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 aims to make the United States corporate tax rate more competitive and therefore increase corporate investment domestically. The bill also provides for individual tax breaks beginning in 2018, that will expire at the end of 2025. What Does This Mean For My Portfolio? Corporations will now be taxed…

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Should Corporations Have a Conscience?

| March 12, 2018

  For decades, it has been conventional wisdom in American business that the one proper objective of corporate managers is to increase the company’s share price. That is the principal behind stock options, which tie compensation to share price. Other considerations, such as worker satisfaction, civic engagement, or environmental impact, have been perceived as irrelevant, except to the extent that they bear on profitability, and thus on share price. The…

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Why Is The Dollar In a Free Fall Against the Euro and the Pound?

| February 12, 2018

Every now and again, we get questions from clients that we think we should share. In this post, we respond to the question in the subject line: why is the dollar in a free fall against the euro and the pound? To be sure, the US dollar is currently not in a “free-fall”. However, it is fair to ask what is behind last years drop in value of the US…

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What’s (not) in a Word: Trade Deficit

| November 15, 2017

  Last month, we wrote about the sometimes misleading terminology used to describe relative currency values: the “strong” and “weak” dollar. Another example of labels that can mislead us about economic issues is one that has been in the news of late: the so-called “trade deficit.” The United States runs a trade deficit with another country when it imports more from that country than it exports to it. The opposite…

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Social Security Benefits for US and Non-US Citizens

| November 13, 2017

  Who is eligible for benefits? Social Security is a significant payroll tax as well as an important source of retirement income for many US and non-US citizens, alike. Workers pay into Social Security while they are working and receive the benefits when they retire. The size of Social Security benefits depends on your earnings history as well as when you begin to take benefits. But what if you are…

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What’s (not) in a Word: Strong Dollar

| October 27, 2017

  Economics is a numerical discipline. Economists count things, measure their value, calculate ratios between those values, and project how the counts and values will change over time. But to communicate economic ideas, we rely largely on language. And for the most part, language is very useful for this purpose, because language is a powerful tool. Sometimes, however, language’s very power can overwhelm the concepts it is supposed to communicate,…

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What Do I Need to Know About Medicare?

| September 28, 2017

(Credit for this post goes to Rehberg Law Group. More information about Rehberg Law Group can be found at the bottom of this page.) “How can I clear up the confusion surrounding Medicare for myself or my parent(s)?”  If that is your concern and with open enrollment right around the corner, retirees will be inundated with advertisements regarding their insurance options.  This information can be conflicting and confusing.  For many…

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Equifax Credit Breach

| September 25, 2017

  If you are concerned about the Equifax credit breach, this site is extremely useful: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-credit-freeze-faqs    

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The Debt Ceiling

| September 19, 2017

  The United States of America always pays its debts. Since the Revolutionary War, the U.S. government has been borrowing money to fund its operations, and it has never failed to make good on its obligations. According to the award-winning financial history, This Time Is Different, no other major power can make that claim. The founding father of this legacy is Alexander Hamilton, who as Secretary of the Treasury argued…

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